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Getting Into the Best Position

My eldest son practices Kendo, and has (on and off) since he was about 12.  He has been a member of Hawaii's team to the World Kendo Tournament three times.  I am sharing this to give you a feel that he is pretty serious about Kendo.

In fact, when he is at my house, he often goes through Kendo movements and stomps his right foot (like they do in Kendo).  I always have to tell him to stop because I am afraid that he will crack our marble floors.  I secretly think that he may have already done so.

Anyway, we often speak about Kendo and he always tells me about a new technique or strategy he is working on or just thought of.  I am always amazed because he has been practicing Kendo for a while.  Nevertheless, he always seems to have come up with something new.

Recently, he told me (I am paraphrasing) that he realized that Kendo is not as much about hitting as it is about getting into the best position to hit.

Now I have heard so many of these thoughts -- maybe hundreds over the years -- but this one made me think... Kendo is not as much about hitting as it is about getting into the best position to hit.

We talked about it.  It certainly takes skill to hit right in Kendo.  But most people who do hit are not in the best position when they do so.  As a result, their hit may be effective, or they may be hit themselves or countered.  There are a lot of considerations.  But when you are in the best position, your hit will probably be better and you will be in a stronger position.

I started to think about how this applies to Karate.  If Karate is about punching, blocking, kicking, etc., then it is certainly true that getting into the best position before we do these things is extremely important.  In some cases, getting into the best position could even make certain things unnecessary.

I am not very tall.  When I was a young student in Judo and later Karate, I was usually one of the shorter students.  As a result, getting in close was always a good strategy for me, and something I actively practiced.  Getting in close -- sometimes extremely close -- gave me an advantage and mitigated some of the advantage my taller partner/opponent might have had.

In Karate, we sometimes practice thousands of punches and kicks -- maybe tens of thousands over time.  But how often do we practice body positioning?  How often do we practice getting into the best position?  How often do we even consider it?

In any event, this is something that I thought about after speaking to my eldest son the other day.


Respectfully,

Charles C. Goodin